Adult Content Warning

This community may contain adult content that is not suitable for minors. By closing this dialog box or continuing to navigate this site, you certify that you are 18 years of age and consent to view adult content.

Worth the risk?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by dchavok, May 5, 2010.

  1. dchavok

    dchavok
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    94
    Location:
    216
    So I just got hit with a decision to make like a ton of bricks today.

    I'm in a job that asks for a two year commitment (no written contracts). I just finished year one. The pay is okay, but its stability.

    Well, something else came calling today. Better pay, better opportunity, better contacts, better references, networking out the ass, and a different spin on the job I currently do. Plus, this job is based upon what I studied/where I want to go in life.

    Problem being, its only a three month gig. But the reference alone could get me a job once its up.

    My decision is whether its worth the risk or not- give up a year of stable pay to chase a dream.

    FOCUS: Life altering/career altering/relationship altering risks you decided to take. Did they work out? Maybe work out unexpectantly? Or are you sitting in your parents basement right now completely averse to taking any more risks?

    ANTIFOCUS: Risks you didn't take. Did it work? Why didn't you go the route?

    Personal Focus: Make my decision for me.
     
  2. Kubla Kahn

    Kubla Kahn
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    421
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    8,409
    Im currently applying for a Visa to travel to China. I'll be looking for english teaching jobs once Im there, or any other company that'll have me. It is scaring me shitless since its about as outside of my comfort zone as I could get. Having been shielded by school for the past couple of decades and living at home for the past year I've never had to fully support myself. Doing so in another country seems intimidating. Luckily my brother lives there now and living with him will ease the transition. I'll let y'all know how it goes....
     
  3. Chellie

    Chellie
    Expand Collapse
    Disturbed

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    454
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Take the risk! Just spend that 3 months saving a cushion in case you don't find something immediately after the gig is up, and don't act like a jackass and burn bridges with the job you have now in case you want to go back later.
    If you don't take the chance, you'll regret it, and wonder 'what if'. Also, a lot of people don't get a 'launch pad' moment in their career to chase their dream, don't miss yours.
     
  4. Frebis

    Frebis
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    262
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,120
    This is one of the dumbest attitudes you can have toward anything. Instead of taking the risk because 'what if', why not evaluate the pros and cons, then make an educated decision?. If your current job requires a two year commitment and you quit after one to pursue what sounds like a fairy tale, we in the industry call that "burning bridges".

    Also, what about your health insurance, benefits, etc? A lot of times that doesn't translate well in 3 month contracts.

    This is from an old post he made-
    If that is what you still do listen to the girl above me. You can't be knee deep in homoerotica and paddles all of your life, advising people that your Dad paid for you to be friends with. Grow the fuck up and get a real job. TAKE THE RISK!!!!
     
  5. Chellie

    Chellie
    Expand Collapse
    Disturbed

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    454
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Given the fact we don't know the particulars of the jobs, the only real con the OP mentions in his post is the lack of stability. If you're not a financial retard, you should be able to compensate for that. If you save smart and plan for things in advance, it's a con you've got under control.
    I am by no means advocating a 'Hey just walk out of your job, and say 'fuck it' when people ask how you'll pay your rent 6 months' attitude. But with careful planning you can nullify a lot of the risk in taking the risk.
     
  6. Coquette

    Coquette
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    21
    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2009
    Messages:
    57
    A little over two years ago, I was respectfully employed, made a kick-ass salary, and had a fairly stable job. I lived in the shit-town of Cleveland, however, and once I met my now-husband, I decided a major life change was in order. I quit my job as a traveling sales manager, moved south to Panama City Beach, remain unemployed, and have never looked back. The road has been grueling, but never once did I question whether I made the right decision. (Please bear in mind the decision was not solely based on the hubby; there are just entirely too many factors to list here)

    Sometimes you need a kick in the ass to realize what you've been missing. Personally, I had spent my entire adult life focusing solely on my career, giving my personal relationships little chance of surviving. I'll be the first to admit I let that pendulum swing too far, and have been working my ass off at finding the balance. Were the past 18 months worth it? Absolutely. Was I terrified? You betcha. But without risk there is no reward - at least that's how the saying goes.

    To the OP: Like Freebis mentioned, benefits, holiday pay, etc., are things to be considered. If it's going to significantly improve your resume and make you more marketable, and you can afford to, say, go without benefits for 90 days, then go for it. If it's just something you'd rather do versus what you're doing now, and you originally signed on for 2 years with the other employer, I'd say man up and stick it out. Burning bridges is a no-no, regardless of what your future aspirations are. Good luck.
     
  7. lust4life

    lust4life
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,562
    Location:
    Deepinthehearta, TX
    Personally, I think anything would look better on a resume than "Fraternity Consultant," regardless of the spin you put on it. I agree with Frebis (did I actually just type that?)--take the real job.
     
  8. Degenerate

    Degenerate
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    85
    How in the fuck is this a hard decision if Option B is where you want to go in life?
     
  9. MoreCowbell

    MoreCowbell
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    14
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    4,185
    Your current job sounds like little more than prolonged adolescence. It sounds like a job for someone who is scared of becoming an adult. I doubt that you'll grow much as a person or learn much about yourself there.
     
  10. Frebis

    Frebis
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    262
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,120
    Part of the post I quoted above mentions he wants to own an NBA franchise some time (I left that out). I think he is taking a job being a water boy for the rest of the playoffs!
     
  11. effinshenanigans

    effinshenanigans
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    109
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,734
    Location:
    CT
    Maybe he's looking to work for a company that's selling an improved version of the bottle bong, or perhaps a new, undetectable, kind of roofies. I think 'Fraternity Consultant' would be a prime stepping stone in that case.
     
  12. SMUGolfer

    SMUGolfer
    Expand Collapse
    Experienced Idiot

    Reputation:
    18
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Messages:
    214
    I quit my job and went back to school knowing I couldn't get anyone to cosign my student loans. It was only one semester, so I wasn't ridiculously over my head in debt at graduation. Graduation was one year ago as of Sunday. I wasn't able to find work for 6 months and what I found didn't work out. So now I'm an order picker making 9.50 and the only gringo on the shift. It was absolutely worth it. After going through some personal trials, watching my class walk, and promising myself that I will do that one day...putting my finances through the shredder short-term while knowing I helped myself long-term is extraordinarily substantial.

    Here's hoping karma sees my point of view on the whole thing...
     
  13. dchavok

    dchavok
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    94
    Location:
    216
    Heh...

    Forgot I posted that. Fuck.

    Yeah. Still doing that. Its a lot tougher shit than you think. Try explaining to a group of guys why they had to find their friend/brother dead at his own hand on a random morning. Or dealing with lawyers. On the surface, yeah, it sounds pretty shallow, I can agree to that. But its a hell of a lot more than just show up to campus, party ass off, bro out.

    I can take the hit though. It was, admittedly, a chance to hang on to college. Also, the only job available that wasn't a temp job or an unpaid internship.

    New job is political. I studied political science, worked on a presidential campaign, etc. First chance to take the step forward, but again, its risky. Leaving behind guaranteed money when you've got loans and car payments and etc is a sonofabitch. Part of me wants to say fuck it and take the leap, but the other part is attempting to be fiscally responsible and determine what keeps me paying the bills. I decided to take it though. Fuck it. If it doesn't pay off...well...that sucks.

    No insurance. No benefits. Nothing of the sort.

    'Sometimes, you just gotta say what the fuck, make your move'.......unless that move is Scientology.
     
  14. RoscoeJ

    RoscoeJ
    Expand Collapse
    Village Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Messages:
    14
    I am currently living through the risk I took about 9 months ago. I had on paper a fantastic job that paid VERY well, intellectually demanding, great networking opportunites and allowed me to travel round Europe on the company's expense. It also had a very good reputation in the industry and was highly respected. If I had stayed on, I would be promoted by now and earning even more. But fuck, was I unhappy. People thought I was crazy for leaving, but it just didnt do it for me and I felt I could be more than it allowed me to be. So what did i do? Went back to school for a 2nd postgraduate degree, but this time in a field not remotely related to what I had been working on the last couple of years but something I had always been interested in. How is it going? Well, the tranisiton from 'living very comfortably' to just about living has been horrific and the most difficult to deal with. However, it has been a wake-up call to how wasteful I have been in the past and how nonchalant I had been to taking opportunites staring at me in the face. It has given me new perspective and I have be exposed to different perspectives and viewpoints

    It was a huge risk, but definitely the right decsion, it has given me time to re-organise my priorities, time to think and to really focus on where I want to take my life. I am about 98% sure that if I had'nt had done this now then I would have gotten into middle age very angry and bitter. Now I dont need to think about 'what-if' scenarios because I have done it. No regrets. Its hard, but in the long run, it has been worth it.

    When I finish, there are SO many opportunities to explore and I am looking forward to that.
     
  15. Frebis

    Frebis
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    262
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,120
    Why in these threads does no one ever have a risk taking story that fails? The guy in the story above sounds like he fails at life now, but because he refuses to see things for what they are he thinks he made the right choice. Is everyone really so self absorbed they can't admit when they made a mistake?
     
  16. lust4life

    lust4life
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,562
    Location:
    Deepinthehearta, TX
    I read his post differently. He was in a lucrative career, but was miserable and decided to risk short-term sacrifice for long-term gain. The decision to do so afforded him the opportunity to reexamine his priorities and perspectives and shift them into alignment with his goals. I wouldn't consider that failing at life. It takes a lot of courage to walk away from a comfortable living and pursue happiness outside the materialistic context, and a great deal of wisdom to see that one is not dependent on the other.
     
  17. RoscoeJ

    RoscoeJ
    Expand Collapse
    Village Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Messages:
    14
    No.

    I have no regrets working in the field I was in before and in no way see it as a mistake, it afforded me with the opportunity to pick up skills and qualifications that are transferrable to multiple disciplines, plus it will always look good on a resume. However when you have to deal with difficult clients asking the world, absolutely zero social life and work that consumes your life entirely, then money isnt as a movtivating factor as it once was. I saw that I was burning myself out and realised there has to be more to this, more to life and a way of working smarter rather than harder to get to where I want to be. Call it what you want but I rather this happened now than 10 years from now when taking a risk like this would be much more difficult to justify.