Adult Content Warning

This community may contain adult content that is not suitable for minors. By closing this dialog box or continuing to navigate this site, you certify that you are 18 years of age and consent to view adult content.

TIB Parental Thread

Discussion in 'Permanent Threads' started by Dcc001, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. Flat_Rate

    Flat_Rate
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    132
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
    Messages:
    2,488

    Actually gives it gives you cancer, Alex Jones says so!


    Also agree with the above, why not? Simple and to the point.
     
  2. LatinGroove

    LatinGroove
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    9
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Texas
    I got lucky with mine. If it's just me and little man with absolutely NOTHING planned and no noise, we can both sleep in until 11 oclock regularly on the weekends. Mine will be five in December and he's been like this for the past year and a half that I can recall.
     
  3. dieformetal

    dieformetal
    Expand Collapse
    Hurricanes Are My Bitch

    Reputation:
    133
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,276
    The 2-year-old and I slept until 9:30. It was glorious.
     
  4. rei

    rei
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    16
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,273
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    Thats how the education system here explained it stating that girls would have option of getting an HPV shot at the school.
     
  5. $100T2

    $100T2
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    108
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,966
    That's for amateurs. Please learn the atomic chair.

    Start in a seated position... With no chair. Put your arms straight out in front of you, make fists. Don't move. I don't think there is a member on this board that can do the atomic chair for more than 3 minutes.
     
  6. D26

    D26
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    110
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,305
    My daughter is a little over a year and she almost always sleeps all night. Maybe once or twice a month she'll wake up in the middle of the night, but even then it is a 20 minute routine to get her back to sleep (new diaper, bottle, she's right back out). Most nights she is in bed by 7:30 PM and she won't wake up until between 6 and 7 AM. She also naps from 11 AM until at least 12:30 or 1 PM (sometimes she can nap 3 hours, if she didn't sleep well the night before).

    Sleep isn't a major issue for the kid, and we are exceptionally lucky, and we know it. We also worked hard at it. If I had a dollar for every time we let her lay in her crib screaming her head off until she fell asleep, I wouldn't need my job anymore. Finally she learned that her crib was for sleep, so we put her down and she goes right out almost every time. Even if she doesn't, she never takes more than 5 minutes to fall asleep, now.

    I'm also knocking on wood consistently as I write this.

    The only two really strange things about my daughter are that 1) she has no teeth, and she is over a year old, and 2) she flat out refuses to walk on her own.

    We can't really control the teeth coming in, so we don't worry about that, but the walking thing drives my wife and I nuts. She'll be standing, holding on to something. We'll hand her a toy. She'll grab it with both hands and stand there for a minute or two playing with it. Then she'll look down, realize she isn't holding anything, and FREAK OUT before falling on her butt. She'll take our hands and walk, but she is just barely holding on. If we fully let go, though, she immediately sits down. She is totally capable of walking on her own, now, but she just seems deathly afraid of falling.

    Any advice on how to get the kid some confidence so she'll start walking on her own? She also learned to crawl kind of late (she did a sort of army-crawl for a good 4 months before finally crawling like normal), too, though, so maybe she just needs more time. Or she is just stubborn and crawling is easier/faster than walking for her right now, so she'll stick to that.
     
  7. Crown Royal

    Crown Royal
    Expand Collapse
    Just call me Topher

    Reputation:
    946
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    22,657
    Location:
    London, Ontario
    My daughter didn't walk until 18 months, but she's a PreMee and has very slow muscle development. She'll eventually just WANT to do it, sick of crawling around while everyone is around her is walking.

    If she's not interested in trying, try to make a game out of it. For instance: my daughter learned because we used stacker toys to tempt her: she couldn't STAND a stacker pile being set up: she had to knock them over and scatter them immedietly. So, we would set up stackers across the room and tell her if she wanted to knock them over, she'd have to walk to them. That turned out to be remarkably effective.

    I'm not saying it will work for your kid, but trying tempting them with a toy/hobby they love.
     
  8. lhprop1

    lhprop1
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,164
    Just don't punish your kid by making them do atomic sit ups.
     
  9. mav_ian

    mav_ian
    Expand Collapse
    Experienced Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    216
    Location:
    Victoria, Australia
    By the sounds of it my kid is only a few months older (I think you told me, I can't remember). so it's not like I have a huge, or even decent, cache of wisdom (though I am just finishing of a low rung course in childcare), but I'd have to second Crown Royal here, and just add that persistence pays off as long as she's associating positive feelings with the whole deal.

    The boy who lives in my house loved baths from the get go (midwives told me it's not often the case), but at roughly 6 months my Mother gave him one, and he accidentally slipped from her grasp as she was about to lift him out. He didn't hurt himself, or even slip under the water, but the sudden fright he got, coupled with my Mum's panicked, loud gasp, was all it took for him to all of a sudden hate bathing. It was months before he quit whining and started enjoying the water again. And even then, when our antipodean summer arrived last December, he took a more than a week just stop clinging on to me for dear life every time we sat in our kiddy pool.
    It sounds like your daughter is missing one element of feeling safe when freestanding that she has holding onto something, and whether or not it was instigated by something real or imagined, it's the association of fear she has made. I'd say try to give her whatever the tool is that she can use to provide that missing element herself and dilute the fear with more positive associations, i.e. the fun that Crown mentioned and I drained the life out of with an unnecessarily long post. But yeah, kids take shit to heart, whether or not we intend it, so I know I have to be vigilant in what signals I give off (fortunately I'm not particularly expressive).

    Do you or your better half make any fuss when she falls, or did? We tried to curb it as much as possible, which was hard at first because for me it is really easy to fall into bubblewrap mode. But he was such a doofus that we got used to him tripping over obvious obstacles all the time, and it got to the point where we could gauge the surrounding hazards and let him teach himself the value of watching where he is going, when the results would be relatively harmless, while still keeping him safe from anything that'd ruin his face.
    When he does fall, it becomes a battle of poker faces while we try to gauge how much he's hurt, and he's trying to gauge how much he can milk it for. If he is actually hurt, he'll let us know soon enough, otherwise we can tell him to just get up, and applaud his effort in doing so himself ("praise the effort, not the child," is a phrase I been diggin' lately).
    When he is just whining for attention, I try to remove as many fluctuations from my tone of voice as I can, and just try to sound gentle and calm as I can, which his Mother sometimes struggles with. If you can find a way to not cave into any resistance, without just making it worse.
    Also, my youngest nephew will be 15 months soon, and he has just switched from army crawling, to pulling himself up on furniture. He is quite a bit taller than his cousin, my kid, so he has further to fall, and who else knows why? Once again agreeing with Crown, there'll be a point where she will want to do more on her own."


    Ooh, look at me, I know everything because I had sex at least once and the reproductive process happened the way nature intended.
     
  10. lhprop1

    lhprop1
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,164
    Funny you should mention that. My little dude had a serious hatred of anything stacked and would smash it with delight every time I tried to build it.

    As for getting him to walk, we used a similar strategy as Crown. My wife and I would sit facing each other. One had his favorite toy and the other had the kid. One of us would hold up the toy and tempt him while the other would hold him in a standing position. At first, we were only a few feet away and he would take those steps to get the toy. As he gained confidence, we increased our distance until walking became natural for him.
     
  11. sisterkathlouise

    sisterkathlouise
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    160
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    827
    **Disclaimer** I am not a parent, I have just been working with kids in different capacities for a while.

    I know that most parents are constantly waiting (often anxiously) for their child to reach the next developmental milestone, and I get that. But have you ever thought that maybe it's a good thing she isn't walking yet? Maybe she inherently knows that walking will be fraught with head bonks and knee scrapes and all other manner of boo-boo. It is absolutely important for you to encourage her and help her gain confidence, but it might be good for you to look at the silver lining, which is that she will probably be better at walking when she finally decides that she's ready to try it. Those over-confident early walkers are the ones that stress me out, because I'm more likely to have to return them to their parents with bumps and bruises.

    Also, if you really want to encourage her to walk, have her hang out with kids around her age or slightly older who are already proficient walkers. (Remember this when it comes time for potty training. Kids teach each other things!) Taking her to places where walking is more fun than crawling might help, too, like parks or a children's museum. Plus those places are full of kids walking around, making it look cool.
     
  12. jdoogie

    jdoogie
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    411
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,026
    Location:
    Columbus Ohio
    This right here. My daughter was a real early walker. She started at 9 months because she would go to her sitter where she was at the time the youngest kid and would always try to be like the bigger kids. Our nanny said the older kids were the ones that would help her stand up and try to walk her around with them. Even now, she still comes home and will exhibit behaviors or mimic words or phrases that I know she couldn't have learned from anywhere other than the other kids she's around all day.
     
  13. TX.

    TX.
    Expand Collapse
    The Mad Pooper

    Reputation:
    421
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,724
    Location:
    With Waylon, Willie and the boys
  14. GTE

    GTE
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    526
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,686
    Enough parental baby talk. Someone give me advice on teaching a 16 y/o girl to drive.

    I have hours and hours into lessons with her and we're stuck on the same things over and over. She rides the right line but makes super wide right turns like she's driving a semi-truck. Few days ago, we're in an industrial area (no traffic) and I have her make a right turn at a stop sign, in the middle of the turn I ask her to stop, we get out and I show her how she's 15' from the curb hoping a visual would work. Nope.

    She also has an issue with doing two things at once; either she's ping ponging between the lines or her speed is all over the place. Either she drives straight (although hugging the right side) while her speed is dropping (we've been down to 22mph on a 45 mph road) and then speeding back up or we're ping ponging between the lines at the speed limit.

    Does she just need lots more practice? I was driving on the freeway and through city traffic within in a few lessons but I was into cars so maybe watched what my parents did before I got behind the wheel? Like most kids, her face is buried in her phone. She literally didn't know which pedal was the gas and the brake.
     
  15. zzr

    zzr
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    123
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    748
    What's the rush? My kids are 18, 16, and 11. I'd give about anything to be able to go back before the time they learned to walk. Unless there's a problem with some development stage, there's no reason to force her to do anything she's not ready for just for the sake of passing some milestone.
     
  16. bewildered

    bewildered
    Expand Collapse
    Deeply satisfied pooper

    Reputation:
    1,183
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Messages:
    10,908
    She may just need a ton of practice until it sinks in.

    I learned on a manual transmission car. My dad took me on The Loop around our neighborhood god knows how many times to learn how to drive without being a danger to anyone else on the road. The Loop had stop signs, an incredibly steep hill with a stop sign at the top that forced me to learn how to properly engage first gear without rolling, speed bumps, turns, etc. I really fucking sucked at getting the car into gear but finally something just clicked in my brain and I could do it. You may need to just baby step her in a lower pressure environment before getting her out on the real road. If her problem is pulling wide turns, take her around the neighborhood block and force her to take turns until she gets it right. Do it over and over. She may hate it just like I did but eventually she will become a good driver. I wasn't allowed on the real road until I showed that I had good driving habits, THEN he let me drive on the road and to school with traffic. Good luck.
     
  17. lust4life

    lust4life
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,562
    Location:
    Deepinthehearta, TX
    I went through the exact same thing with my daughters. Practice is the answer.
     
  18. Crown Royal

    Crown Royal
    Expand Collapse
    Just call me Topher

    Reputation:
    946
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    22,657
    Location:
    London, Ontario
    It sounds like she's doing a very common learning mistake: not gassing the car as you go around the corner while not letting the wheel slip through your hands. Tell her to gas the peddle as soon as as she stArts turning. I personally remember doing this while learning.

    A great place to teach control is of all places in a graveyard. They usually only have one-lane roads, so it will get he used to centering the car in the lane.

    She's young and nervous. When a car comes at you the first time while driving it looks like an asteroid. It'll pass.
     
  19. Crown Royal

    Crown Royal
    Expand Collapse
    Just call me Topher

    Reputation:
    946
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    22,657
    Location:
    London, Ontario
     
  20. Veovis

    Veovis
    Expand Collapse
    Disturbed

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    299
    Even though I grew up driving from a young age on the farm, I will say first runs on a highway felt very much like this. Best solution, is (in my mind) to go on a safe (minimally busy) highway and simply practice. I got learners permit at 15, Alberta is 14 and you have to drive with parents for 1 to 2 years in all environments.

    Experiences with proper supervision is the best teacher there is in my mind, but it must be done in an environment that encourages and improves the kids abilities. Where I live now a kid can turn 16 get learners and then licence in a few months and then have 3 years of restrictions ( though good, don't equal practical supervised experience)

    As for normal parenting. HA, got a 5 and 7 year old, both different in major ways and one trick for one is pointless for the other. I simply have found trying to continually know my kids as they constantly change, though pretty much impossible, is to talk to them constantly, and try to get off my adult high horse and think "kid" from time to time to understand their logic, as they often have a valid point I just get to old to listen right, yet they are trying to tell me.

    And sometimes they are just pricks. Love em anyways.