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The Woodworking Thread

Discussion in 'Permanent Threads' started by $100T2, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Flat_Rate

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    End tables and a coffee table, poly is still wet but they turned out good.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. katokoch

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    I'm going to be helping a buddy build a top and box for his kegerator out of African Bubinga soon. My local lumberyard carries a good inventory of it, I've always wanted to give it a try (it is super dense and has insane color and figure) and I'm not paying for it, so this will be fun.

    This only shows a bit of my "shop" but I finally like how my tools are organized in front of my workbench. Finally putting the pegboard to use, a few months before I have to move everything.

    [​IMG]

    While moving my stuff will suck, I get to build a new workspace from the ground up and have everything exactly how I want it. Construction may take a bit but I'm talking benches at the correct heights for sitting vs standing work, shelves, pegboard, all of that good stuff. Moving into a house that had an existing shop was nice but some things, like working at a bench made for someone a foot shorter than me, really sucks.
     
  3. Rush-O-Matic

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    Was the change in the center bar between the legs and the skirt* piece under the top surface done for stability or style?

    *I have no idea what you call that part.
     
  4. Flat_Rate

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    Re: Re: The Woodworking Thread

    The guy I made them for wanted a brace in there, it does help with making the legs feel stronger.

    I think 200 for the set was a fair price, it's just 3/4 pine but it'll last way longer than anything at ikea
     
  5. Nettdata

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    Not exactly woodworking, but I'm building a box.

    A big box.

    My time working at a record label and being on tour have paid off, because I'm basically building a huge road case to strap down to the bed of my open trailer. I didn't want a box trailer, but I wanted a box to transport large amounts of shit when I go camping, or move back to BC, like I am in 10 days.
    The box is going to be 6' long, 4' wide, and 3.5' tall, with a 1' lid on it.

    Here's the trailer:


    Using cheapest 3/8" construction grade plywood I could find, at $8 a 4'x8' sheet, and bought a bunch of ABS textured 4'x8' sheets at $40 a sheet, I then cut them down to the sizes I needed. I was tempted to laminate the 4x8 plastic to the 4x8 plywood, but it was just too unwieldy, and the contact cement would have set up too fast to do it well.


    Laminated the pieces over a couple of nights. Took a bit of time, and got more than a little high, especially since it was cold out and I had to work with the garage door closed to keep the temp within the operating limits of the contact cement.


    Got all the pieces done and trimmed perfectly square. A couple of small mistakes meant taking about 2" off the total dimension, but close enough for the women I date.... they'll still fit in the box.


    I then ordered the $600 worth of aluminum pieces-parts for the box; the double angled aluminum corners, the tongue and groove lid trim, the corners, the recessed lockable hatches, the detachable hinges for the lid, the handles, the corners, and the recessed tie down loops.

    I've started to trim the pieces and rivet them to the box, which should take me a night or two, depending on how much I stay at it.


    Once this is done, and the box is all put together, it's going to be pretty weak, structurally speaking. My plan is to get it Rhino-Lined (truck bedliner) with a couple of layers, which will not only make it water tight on the inside, but will solidify the fuck out of it. I also plan on leaving some of the mounting hardware extruding into the inside of the box so that it'll embed within the epoxy of the bedliner, increasing the strength of the bond. I also plan on laying down some cardboard cylinders (cut in half) on the inside of the lid and on the floor/bottom before it gets lined to add in structural support, just like you would with basic fibreglass stuff. (Bedliner is just a big, strandy epoxy spray, after all... same concepts apply).

    So yeah, it's a big, ugly box... not exactly your typical woodworking project, but I thought I'd share.
     

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  6. BakedBean

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    I'm looking to get a Kreg jig for pocket holes and they run the gamut from roughly $20 to almost $150. All I'll be doing with it right now is a coffee table and maybe some picture frames but I can see the big one coming in handy down the line. Anybody have any experience with these, enough to tell me if I should save my money and get the big one, or if the less expensive ones will be all I'll need for those projects for right now?
     
  7. Flat_Rate

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    Re: Re: The Woodworking Thread

    <a class="postlink" href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000J43A7W/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1400192321&sr=8-2&pi=SX200_QL40" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000J43A7 ... SX200_QL40</a>

    The other models are nice and maybe one day I'll own one but the model I have linked I have used to make countless projects, never had an issue with it. Well worth 40 dollars.
     
  8. BakedBean

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    Re: Re: The Woodworking Thread

    Just ordered mine - had $25 left on an Amazon gift card from Xmas, and a Prime account. I'll get it Saturday and put it right to use. Gracias!
     
  9. Flat_Rate

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    Re: Re: The Woodworking Thread

    Order the Kreg screws while you're at it, Amazon usually has the best prices.
     
  10. Nettdata

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    Progress this morning... the lid is done. Now time to drink.


     

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  11. Flat_Rate

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    Table and benches ready for the customer to pick up, they both loved it, also said I was the lowest price they had been quoted at $500 for the set, maybe I should raise my prices.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Danger Boy

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    this is pretty cool:

     
    #112 Danger Boy, Aug 11, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 27, 2015
  13. ghettoastronaut

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    Someone had asked me to show pictures of this project of a wooden wire spool being turned into a proper table:
     

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  14. Not the Bees!

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    I've been trying to start woodworking as a hobby for the last year or so. I have no background in it and started with no tools. This is my first foray into furniture and I'm pretty proud of it. It's nothing special and it pales in comparison to some of the stuff people on here can do. But my GF loves it and wants me to start building more furniture for the house. Mostly it's just nice to have something to show my friends and family when they ask how my hobby is going.
     

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  15. Rush-O-Matic

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    Nice job. Somebody with more experience than me might be able to comment better on this . . . but this is what I have found in my experience. It looks like there's no bracing in the back. Over time, as the piece gets moved around or moved from place to place, those connections will start to go out of square and wobble. You may want to consider attaching a back board; or if you like the open look, you could either add it on just the lower half, or do triangle braces in the corners. Two cents.
     
  16. Not the Bees!

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    Cheers for the advice, I'll start doing some research into braces and thinking about what will look good. I do really like the open look, so I'm not keen to put a backboard on it.
     
  17. Flat_Rate

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    Experimenting with some Oak and Poplar for beer mugs, I was going to add a handle but they look good to me without. I have the epoxy curing on the inside now but I'd imagine they will hold a few beers at least.

    They are ten inches tall. Came out well for an afternoon fucking around with them, the bottoms have 1 or 2 spots that didn't glue up the greatest but the epoxy will take care of that.

    These were all made on the table saw, no other special tools or lathes etc are needed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  18. katokoch

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    That's awesome... just set the table saw blade to the right angle for the joints? How did you do the base?
     
  19. Flat_Rate

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    Yeah I really just eyeballed it, I think the angle was 13 degrees on the saw, those are one inch strips that got trimmed down when the angles were cut, took 15 pieces to make each one.

    I traced the bottoms out after the mugs dried and still had the angles, then is was just a matter a making a bunch of small cuts on the table saw to get it close, glued the base one and then used a palm sander to round out the outsides as much a I felt doing.

    I wish I had a benchtop belt sander, they'd be as close to perfectly circular as they could be.
     
  20. wexton

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    Technically it should of been 12 degrees. 360 degrees divided by the number of pieces, divided by two(both sides have angles). Because all your angles have to add up to 360 degrees because you are making a circle.

    If you are doing a 90 degree corner piece. If you have 6 pieces and the very outside ones you want square, so you would have 4 pieces with both angles and 2 pieces with 1 angle, so you would need to cut 10 angles, so 90/10 = 9 degree each cut.