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The Woodworking Thread

Discussion in 'Permanent Threads' started by $100T2, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Aetius

    Aetius
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    Well fuck, with a bandsaw that size I can see why. Who needs a table saw when you've got a bandsaw that can split redwoods?
     
  2. wexton

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    Pretty much. I was going to say, only one i would keep would be my table saw. But god dam, that is a bandsaw.
     
  3. katokoch

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    Holy shit that's a machine!

    I don't have a specific saw in mind... more like I could use some direction. Ultimately I'd like the capability to re-saw 2" boards up to 8-9" width so I'd need at least 10" height capacity. I'd also be sawing dense walnut and maple... meaning it needs some power.

    Can something that would fit in the garage be feasible? Like a 14" saw with a height attachment?
     
  4. wexton

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  5. Firefnd1982

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    Gimme that as a sliding miter saw... In other news picked up one of those dewalt miters in 10" for $40 at the pawn shop because it had a broken rebound spring.. wooohoo 6 dollar part
     
  6. $100T2

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    I love my compound miter saw, but I really, really wish I had bought the sliding version.

    Since someone did put up an Alt. Focus of tool reviews, I'm going to go ahead and talk a bit about the Ryobi Plus system.

    I have these 18v tools:

    Drill - impact gun - close quarters drill - planer - router - 5 1/4" circular saw - sawzall - jigsaw - chain saw - angle grinder - buffer - flashlight - radio

    There may be more that I've forgotten about.

    I have six batteries and 3 chargers as well.

    Overall, it's a great system. Having a bunch of tools that take the same batteries which are easily interchangeable is very handy. My favorite tool is definitely the impact gun. It won't take the place of an air gun as it's not strong enough for frozen bolts or lug nuts, but for bolting together anything that needs to really get bolted together, it's very, very handy. The radio is the thing I use the most: It has an AM/FM and an AUX input, so one battery can give you about 36 hours of music from your mp3 player.

    The sawzall and angle grinder are basically useless. They work great, but can also go through a fully charged battery in about 2.5 minutes. The chain saw is strictly for pruning very, very small trees. Of course, I have a kick ass Stihl chain saw for when I really need to do damage, so if you are looking just to do some trimming and don't feel like dragging out the big saw, it's ok, but I've used it less than 20 times. The buffer also chews through batteries, but it's small and handy for doing the tougher areas of the car after you put away the big buffer. The router and 5 1/4" saw are really nice for small, quick jobs where you don't need the power of your bigger plug in units. The saw may be small, but I've put it through 3/4" MDF with no issues.

    Overall, it's a great system. Just avoid anything that is an obvious power hog like the angle grinder, and you should be very happy. I bought the set about 5 years ago, and I've only killed the drill in that time.
     
  7. wexton

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    I will second this a thousand time, i have a Canadian Tire Mastercraft one, that built my entire 1000sq.ft basement. And batteries just died, only reason they did, because i stupid ran the batteries down to nothing before charging them, Lithium-ion batteries do not like this.

    Thing i like most about them is the fact the it is nice and small/light and has alot of power for it's size.
     
  8. $100T2

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    OK, the table on the bandsaw is all cleaned and buffed. I don't think the blade is on right at all, and I think I might need tires on the wheels.
     
  9. $100T2

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    Before:


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    Here's the issues. Number one, is the blade on right?


    Also, in this picture, the blade is not touching the wheel behind it, and I think it's supposed to to help keep it in place.

     

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  10. $100T2

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  11. JC62

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    A couple of things concerning the blade placement / location - When the blade is first put on and you run the band saw it should self correct into the right location. The large wheel on the top that the saw blade goes around may have an adjustment so you can tilt the wheel forward and backward so the blade works it's way to back of the large wheels both above and below the table. That being said if the blade is as far back as it can go, it appears the blade guides you have on the saw are the wrong size. The blade guide should cover the entire saw blade with out touching the teeth on the blade. You should have a set of guides for 1/2" blades, 3/8" blades, 1/4" blades, etc.. The blade guides should be centered to the blade and as close as possible without scraping against the blade. As far as the small wheel behind the blade - it doesn't necessarily have to touch the blade if there isn't any pressure on the blade - if the saw is running but you aren't cutting anything the blade may not touch that small wheel. You also should ensure that you have the correct tension on the blade, if the blade is too loose it will flex as you have described in previous posts.

    Another thing - the arm that the blade guides mount in should be able to move up and down in relationship to the table. Keep the guides as close to your work piece as possible with out interfering with you ability to move the piece. That will also keep any flexing to a minimum.

    I hope this makes sense and helps out - if you need clarification let me know
     
  12. ghettoastronaut

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    So I was walking through a department store today and saw this bedframe and sort of being in the market for a new one, liked it. But the sales lady told me it was display only, and was just a custom one they had brought in. It seems feasible to make it from raw lumber, provided tools and workspace. Does anyone have any good places to start looking for how one would learn to make this? Tips for finding workspaces / tools?

    Belay that thought, my blackberry takes pics that are too large to upload.
     

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  13. Bob Trousers

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    Depends on your definition of 'feasible'. I mean no disrespect mate, seriously, but something that looks that simple took a lot of fucking work to get to that stage. The headboard alone would've cost a small fortune. So factor in the hundreds of dollars in lumber, then the sash cramps needed to hold that together during glue up, and already you're in a big commitment. Then? Do you have an industrial planer/thicknesser/sander to get it perfect? If not, you best be damn handy with hand tools (no pun intended).

    Go for it-I'd love to have a crack at it, but make no mistake-unless you have money to burn, this will be a labor of love.
     
  14. suapyg

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    Sometimes it'll take me a little while to respond because I'm both busy and a fucking scatterbrain, but anyone who wants to take on a project in a serious way and needs someone they can check in with for guidance, I'm happy to do it.

    I can help you figure out what you might need to get it done and help you evaluate whether you're being realistic or not, too, I guess.

    Ghetto, give a little context: Where in the country are you? What experience do you have? Do you own any tools? Have access to machinery?

    That headboard, with a certain level of assumed skill and access to the right machines, isn't actually that daunting even if you don't have a lot of clamps. A work table, four clamps, two beams and a pair of large opposing wedges would do the trick just fine.

    The Egyptians didn't have clamps and machinery, and neither did the Greeks. They had math, and slaves. And they made some pretty amazing shit.
     
  15. ghettoastronaut

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    After closer inspection, I found out that the whole thing is just veneer on particle board. I suppose that makes things easier for the headboard, but at the same time, I'm wondering about the construction of the base, and how you'd reinforce it to support the mattress and whatever activities take place on top of it.

    As for experience, I've done some basic stuff with tools, namely, auto shop and volunteering for Habitat for Humanity. I have about as many tools as you might expect to find in a typical apartment in a city (I live in Ottawa), but I could buy some if necessary. In terms of workspace, well, not much where I live. My balcony has enough square footage to be usable in good weather. I can't say I have access to any kind of slaves, but I did well enough in math, as long as building this doesn't require integration of binomial series.
     
  16. suapyg

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    Looks to me like that mattress is on a boxspring, which would mean it only needs something to support it under the perimeter.

    Are you saying that you feel comfortable and able to make the headboard out of veneered particle board?
     
  17. katokoch

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    My simple-stupid idea is to simply build a frame for the bed and headboard, and cover it with 1x6-1x8 hardwood boards for looks, so the whole thing is kinda like a covered box.

    The last three beds I've slept on have sat on frames I've built for super cheap using 2x6s (legs), 2x4s (the rest of the frame), and 1x3s across the frame to rest the mattress on and kinda act like a box spring... ~$25 gets the job done and I think you could easily build on a simple frame to make the headboard and use your hardwood of choice so it doesn't look like my cheap beds frames.

    Tool-wise you'd need a drill and would probably want a miter saw (scratch that definitely want one) in addition to clamps and measuring/marking equipment as well as your finishing stuff.
     
  18. ghettoastronaut

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    My understanding of veneering is that you basically iron the veneer onto whatever it's going on to. Seems simple enough, but I'm willing to admit my ignorance on the subject. Simpler than gluing together multiple pieces of pine 6x6's to make the headboard, at any rate (although making it of solid wood would be pretty badass).

    Any idea about joining the frame to the headboard?
     
  19. suapyg

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    For starters, don't get fancy joining them together - it doesn't get seen. Use big bolts, and make sure the nuts are accessible so you can tighten them after a few seasons of movement and whatever depraved shit you get up to on the thing.

    Now - veneer vs. solid. There's a bunch of different types of veneering - you could buy the stuff that has a backing and you just use contact cement with a roller, there may be some product out there that has an iron-on heat-activated glue, you can even do that with yellow wood glue. First of all, this assumes you can make the plywood/particle board box it's going on.
    If you're going to take that route, I'd recommend the contact cement. You can almost certainly find videos online to help you, and even the knucklehead in your local lumberyard can probably give you some good advice.

    If you want to this with solid lumber, you're going to need someone/someplace to mill the stock RELIABLY square. And by "square," I don't mean it has to be 6x6 per se, it can be 6x8 or whatever - I mean the sides have to be 90 degrees to each other, for real, and the opposite faces have to be parallel. And they'll have to be flat and straight, as well.

    Basically you either need to be a badass with a handplane, or you'll need someone who has a jointer and a planer (planer and surfacer to you Brits). Find those machines, and you can either learn to do it yourself (if your friend will allow you the possibility of cutting all your fingers off in his shop), or hire someone to do that part for you.

    Once you have the lumber all squared off, you want to glue them all together. You could just drill through them all in the exact same spots on each log, and use some threaded rod and nuts and washers to hold everything together while the glue dries (or even use decorative nuts and just leave it bolted - hell, you don't even need glue in that case), and then plug the holes on the top edge.

    If you want to do it with no holes and no threaded rod, I can show you how to do it with two beams and opposing wedges like an Egyptian slave, but I'll probably want to sketch that out for you and take a picture, so I'll wait for you to tell me which way you want to go.
     
  20. SBSam

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    I'd be really interested in learning about the process using the wedges in any case.