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The Tech Help Thread

Discussion in 'Technical Board' started by rei, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. Dcc001

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    Someone please just tell me which television to buy. I'm hoping for:

    - Size = 50"- 55"
    - Apps already installed, like Netflix, Crave, etc.
    - I don't need it for gaming.

    There's one at Walmart for $289, and there's one at Best Buy for $4500. So...yeah. WTF. Obviously I'd like as inexpensive as possible, but I don't want one that lasts 30 days and has black lines all through it, either. I've had an Aquos for almost 7 years now and it's been good as gold. What do I buy please help.
     
  2. wexton

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    The ones from walmart are generally junk unless you are buying name brand, the best buy for 4500 is a 4k tv. You should be able to pick up a 50-55 name brand tv for under 1000.
     
  3. wexton

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  4. Rush-O-Matic

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    Just to add to the confusion (sorry DCC) . . . I bought a 42" Toshiba LCD from Best Buy about 5 years ago. It's got a dead pixel and burns in images when I pause. I bought a smaller TCL (no name) at Walmart (32", I think) for a spare room and it's awesome. It was cheap, and has Netflix, Hulu, etc. (Roku) built in. It's not 4k, but the 1080p looks great, including fast action sports. So, YMMV.

    You can spend $400 now and $400 to replace it in 5 years. Or you can spend $800 now.
     
  5. Dcc001

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    Yeah I have a 32" Sharp Aquos that's been good as gold for 7 years. I'm kind of leery of buying the ultra cheap ones for the main house tv.
     
  6. Binary

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    Samsung manufactures a huge number of the panels used in a lot of different TVs, and I generally think they've got a pleasing color. I've bought Samsung TVs for several years now.

    Within the Samsung range, usually the specs will highlight the differences between price points. IMO, 4k isn't worth it unless you're a real movie junky or something.

    Also, you could skip the "smart" TVs and just get a Roku or a Chromecast or something. You'll get a cheaper TV that isn't at the whims of a TV manufacturer's updates.
     
  7. Nettdata

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    I've been very satisfied with the LG screens that I've had over the years, enough that I'm pretty loyal to the brand.

    And agree on the SMART stuff... it's never worth it, and there are a ton of security problems with them these days. Some small print explains that EVERY sound that the TV hears is being broadcast up to the parent company. Never mind the fact that their software is usually shit, and well behind in features.

    Personally, I have a "dumb" TV with the latest gen AppleTV, and it rocks. I have a PLEX server in the house, and it has a PLEX client, as well as a number of other, modern, up to date apps.

    If you aren't in the Apple ecosystem, then (as Binary mentioned) Chromecast is a great way to go.

    Personally, I can't stand ROKU, and preferred my Western Digital Live box instead... way better interface, faster, etc.
     
  8. Hoosiermess

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    I have a small issue/question. My desktop PC at home is plugged directly into my modem and runs at about 30Mbps but if I hop on my wifi with my laptop in the same room as my router it maxes out at around 15Mbps but will sometimes run around 5Mbps (resetting usually bumps it back up to around 15). I have a sonos system running on my wifi as well as dish tv but that has a separate router that only runs the joey on my patio tv. Is it normal for the wifi to be that much slower or is that a function of so much stuff running on the wifi? It wouldn't really bother me except that it seems like the kodi running on my andriod tv box as well as netflix/amazon TV and what not take forever buffering and its annoying. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
     
  9. Nettdata

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    Yes, unless you paid stupid money for a specialty wifi and network card, the bandwidth will be way, way less than a hard-wired connection.

    Think of it as the difference between a fire hose and a garden hose.

    Depending on the wifi and devices attaching to it, it could give each device full available wifi bandwidth (which is much lower than hard-wired bandwidth), but more than likely you'll have multiple devices fighting for that garden hose of water/bandwidth.

    If the signal starts to go wonky (neighbours using similar frequencies/channels, or other devices in the house conflicting with the radio signal), the wifi will basically decrease the transfer speed to improve reliability and quality. Basically, the relationship is "the lower the speed, the higher the quality, and the higher the speed, the more flaky or unreliable". There are some internal quality algorithms that cause it to detect shit performance and reliability and drop down the transfer rate, and sometimes they are rather bad at turning the speed back up when things get better. You restarting the modem causes it to start back up at the top speed. Also, those network devices are usually pretty shitty, and sometimes get bogged down due to bad internal memory management, too many processes or network connections for the hardware, that kind of thing... restarting the device causes it to clean all that stuff up and start fresh, only to get bogged down slowly over time.

    Older wifis used to use the 2.4Ghz which was the same frequency as cordless phones and some microwaves, so when the phone would ring or someone would use the microwave, the wifi would die.

    Higher frequencies in use now (5 Ghz) allow for more overlap between different devices (other wifis, phones, etc), so you can get a bit more reliability and performance.


    In the end, not all wifi is the same. Your cheap Best Buy piece of crap will be minimal in performance, whereas something like the high-end (and relatively expensive) Amplifi LR is fantastic.

    https://www.amazon.ca/AmpliFi-Long-...e=UTF8&qid=1492101828&sr=8-1&keywords=amplifi

    Apple's Airport Extreme is also a very solid performer.
     
    #1449 Nettdata, Apr 13, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  10. Hoosiermess

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    I had the IT guys I use at work set it up so I would guess it's a bit better than a cheap one but I'll check what it is and see if upgrading that helps. Thanks Nett.
     
  11. Nettdata

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    A lot of it comes down to what hardware you purchase. If you spent $100, it's probably shit... if you spent $300 or more, odds are it's a "good one".

    For most people, the "shit" one is probably good enough.

    It could be set up perfectly but still perform like shit just because of the underlying hardware.
     
  12. Hoosiermess

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    Gotcha. They probably figured it would be good enough for me. Either way both of those you talked about have great reviews and look to be easy to set up so I'm hoping for an easy fix. I've had good luck with Apple products so I'm leaning that way.
     
  13. Hoosiermess

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    Just as a follow up here, I went with the Apple Airport Extreme and my issue is fixed. Surprisingly easy to set up, it probably took all of five minutes and I'm running just as fast over wifi as I am plugged in.

    Thanks Nett!
     
  14. Nettdata

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    Nice! Good to hear.
     
  15. Dcc001

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    So I just bought a Sharp Ultra 4K HD smart tv. Yay! Google is turning up goose eggs on a question, though...can you add the Crave TV app to this thing or not?
     
  16. Binary

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    Usually, you can't add apps to a Smart TV. You could try connecting it to Wi-Fi to see if it will automatically update its firmware to add the CraveTV app, but if not, you're out of luck.

    That said, usually the "smart" part of the smart TVs won't be anywhere near as good as a proper smart device like a Roku. You might well be better off just disconnecting the TV from Wi-Fi entirely, and buying a Roku (or a Chromecast if you want something cheaper, but the Roku will be nicer). The Roku will be a better overall experience than the smart TV, most times, and when it gets out of date, you discard the cheap set top box and buy a new one instead of having your thousand+ dollar TV be out of date.
     
  17. wexton

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    My Samsung smart TV you have a big list of apps that you can install.
     
  18. Dcc001

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    I'll just keep the Apple TV hooked up to it.

    Another question...the pre installed pictures that showed during the initial setup have insane clarity and sharpness. Netflix and cable programming do not. They're way grainier. Any reason why? If the tv is capable of that quality why is it not showing?
     
  19. Nettdata

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    4k resolution is insanely high resolution compared to normal TV or movie resolution. Most "HD" cable channels are only 1080, or 1/4 of the 4k resolution your new tv is capable of.

    There are very limited 4k sources in Canada right now. See the Rogers 4k FAQ for example: http://www.rogers.com/web/support/tv/4ktv/427

    Netflix will be limited by the resolution that the source content is provided in and constrained by the network connection you have... streaming 4k will take a TON of bandwidth even with the best of compression. If I remember correctly you need to have a 25Mbps stream for 4k compared to 5Mbps for HD. So not only does the original show need to be provided in 4k, but your internet connection needs to be able to support the speed/bandwidth required to show it. If the source isn't 4k or your bandwidth can't support it, then you'll get a much lower resolution feed and your TV will up-sample the original source as best it can to display well on the 4k monitor, but it won't be clear or crisp like actual 4k source.

    You can get 4k if you connect to a computer (and use it as a big monitor) and play video games, etc., or show really high-res still pictures from a camera, or video from a 4k video recorder you took some footage with.
     
  20. Binary

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    @Dcc001 Roku makes a 4k compatible unit (Apple does not, currently), so if you decide you really want that sweet, sweet 4k on the few sources that support it (some Netflix, YouTube, displaying photos, etc.), you could consider that.