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The Idiot Board Readers Corner - General Discussion

Discussion in 'Books' started by ReverendGodless, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. Juice

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    Anyone read anything by David Thorne? Just got his second book. I think hes BSing a lot of the time and his reddit AMA was a trainwreck, but it definitely made me laugh out loud more than once.
     
  2. downndirty

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    Mark Rowland's "The Philosopher and the Wolf". This philosophy professor on a whim ends up with a wolf. Hilarity and deep-thinking ensue. A really worthwhile read, especially for dog people. Highly recommended, even though I disagree with some of his ideas.
     
  3. downndirty

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    Just finished Elon Musks book. Seriously impressive. I highly recommend it. This dude makes Steve Jobs look pathetic in terms of his vision and creativity.
     
  4. walt

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    A couple I've read recently:

    One Year After by William Forstchen - It's afollow up to his end of the world novel, "One Second After" released several years ago. Set in a small Southern town after an EMP attack on the U.S. It was pretty good, not as good as the first one, a little predictable but I still enjoyed it. ( I enjoy "end of the world as we know it" fiction )

    Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein - I know a lot of people love this book but it left me kinda "meh". The socio-political aspect was good, the rest of it just did nothing for me. I didn't feel like I really cared about the characters.

    Star Wars: Tales From Mos Eisley Cantina by various authors - A pretty good read for Star Wars fans, telling more story about some of those weird characters you see in the cantina scene. It was a good before bed read.

    Star Wars: Aftermath by Chuck Wendig - I tried, I really did, but I couldn't get into this book. It's supposed to tie ROTJ and The Force Awakens together somehow, but I felt it was so poorly written and lacking character development that after several chapters I had little idea of what was going on and finally gave up less than 1/3 of the way in.
     
  5. Bundy Bear

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    For those who enjoyed reading GoT and other similar books do yourselves a massive favour and get into The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson and the associated books by Ian C. Esslemont.

    The depth of the world that these two guys have created is simply astonishing and sucked me in faster than any book I've read before.
     
  6. CharlesJohnson

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    Night Film - Marisha Pessl. Get it out of the way first. The author is smoking hot. Anyway. The book, a NY set mystery about a reclusive movie director involved in cult like doings and possibly child murders, and a disgraced journalist trying to unravel the story. Think Roman Polanski meets All The President's Men meets House of Leaves. Most mysteries fall into the same tired tropes: bad writing, too much exposition with inane details, the protagonist falling into obvious traps which are mostly self inflicted, character doing stupid things to advance the plot. Pessl avoids these for the most part, which was refreshing. The story itself is kind of unique in that I really haven't read it before; it's clever, really clever. Actually suspenseful and tense. Predictable, though, but what can you do about that? It's a symptom of the genre. Anyone who has been to NY sees that the city is used as a character almost as much as the actual characters.

    Luckiest Girl Alive - Jessica Knoll. Not light reading. About rape, shitty yuppies, terrible selfish people. It starts out almost like Knoll is channeling Bret Easton Ellis, but as the main character's motivations and experiences are explained it offers a satisfying bit of writing. Fairly genuine account of what it is like to experience and move on from sexual attacks (as genuine as I can fathom being a dude). Seriously, every character is a piece of shit in some way. It is highly pessimistic, and there is a tinge of "every man is awful" in there. The marketing for the book made it sound like a Gillian Flynn whodunnit knock-off, but that isn't the case at all. Character drama, not a mystery.
     
  7. walt

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    A lot of my favorite authors who write post apocalyptic stuff have finished up their series or have moved on to different genres. I need to find some more series to sink my teeth into. The problem is, there's so much poorly written shit out there to sift through.

    "V-Plague" series by Dirk Patton. If you're looking for something to read, this series may be for you:

    19 books long, it may be a little too long by about 3-4 books. But they're a good read and kept me coming back for more. I just finished #19.


    Everything Is Fucked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson. Not a bad read:

    Confessions of a Pagan Nun by Kate Horsley

    A friend of mine recommended this to me years ago and somehow his copy ended up on my library shelf for years. I finally got it out and read it. I was pleasantly surprised by how good it was and gave a look at the introduction of Christianity to Ireland through the eyes of the Druids.

    I'm looking for more books to read. I love coming on a series where there's several books already released like when I finally discovered Harry Potter or Roger Zelazny's "Amber" series. What are you guys reading these days?
     
  8. toytoy88

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    I'm still reading Harry Turtledove alternate history stuff. He's not really a great writer, but he does have a solid knowledge of history and enough imagination to make it interesting, even though he repeats himself constantly which is infuriating..


    I'm currently reading his The War That Came Early series (Which is 6 books)...it poses the question What if Chamberlain never signed the Munich Accord? I'm just about through the second book and it's pretty "Meh". I bought all the books, so I'll end up plowing through them.

    I recently finished off his Southern Victory series (What if the south had won the Civil War?)....it was 11 books, but a damn good story.

    Before that I read his Atlantis series (3 books) which was interesting enough in it's own right.

    I still say his World War/Colonization series (8 books) is his best...it poses the question "What if in the middle of WWII aliens attacked?" I've read the series multiple times.
     
  9. walt

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    I can't remember if it was you or someone else who recommended that series in the past, but I have yet to check it out. I'll add it to the list.
     
  10. Clutch

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    I started and finished Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance in a single day. It's a very good book, and you should read it if you haven't done so yet. It hit pretty close to home for me in both the figurative and literal sense, as I'm very familiar with many of the places he talks about in the book.

    Island by Aldous Huxley was a bit of a slog to get through in points, but I thought it was a nice utopian counterweight to Brave New World tempered with a throughline of cynicism. I don't know if Island is worth reading on its own, but together they give a picture of Huxley's worldview that makes both books better.
     
  11. walt

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    I think aspects if that book can be applied to any blue collar family outside Appalachia. There were definitely traits of people in the book that reminded me of my own family growing up.

    All I remember of Brave New World is a woman described as "pneumatic".
     
  12. Aetius

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    If you're looking for fantasy, the big series (most of which you've probably heard of) are:

    The Lord of the Rings ~ J.R.R. Tolkien
    The Chronicles of Narnia ~ C.S. Lewis
    Harry Potter ~ J.K. Rowling
    His Dark Materials ~ Philip Pullman
    A Song of Ice and Fire ~ George R.R. Martin
    The Wheel of Time ~ Robert Jordan
    The Kingkiller Chronicle ~ Patrick Rothfuss
    Mistborn ~ Brandon Sanderson
    The Stormlight Archive ~ Brandon Sanderson
    The Dark Tower ~ Stephen King

    As for myself, I recently finished The Fifth Risk by Michael Lewis. Lewis has an amazing talent for making an incredibly boring subject fascinating (baseball statistics, wall street bond trading, high frequency trading, etc), and he does it again in Fifth Risk with the sprawling Federal bureaucracy and what exactly it does for us on a day to day and year to year basis. Somewhat inherently a condemnation of the Trump administration and the degree to which it was completely unprepared/hostile to the Federal government in a way that neither Obama nor Bush were, it does a good job of making the point that the Federal government is so large because it does so much, and to attack it without understanding what it does or why it does it is foolhardy at best.
     
  13. walt

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    I am reading "The Road To Woodstock" by Michael Lange right now and it's a good read.

    My wife turned me on to Bookbub.com and I've been picking up some good titles as dirt cheap prices lately. I highly recommend it.
     
  14. walt

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    I just finished The Last Jew Of Treblinka by Chil Rajchman. After that I needed something lighter and am reading I Suck At Girls by Justin Halpern. It's pretty damn funny.

    My wife turned me on to BookBub, which sends daily recommendations of books that are marked way down on Amazon. I've found a lot of great titles that way.
     
  15. toytoy88

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    I just started a re-read of The Boys in the Boat, the story of the UW rowing team which won the gold in Berlin in '38. Phenomenal writing. It actually makes you care about rowing. The author's such a great story teller that I went and searched out his other works and found Under a Flaming Sky: The Great Hinckley Firestorm. I've ordered it and am greatly looking forward to reading it....it's the story of a fire in 1894 that burned 400 square miles in 4 hours.

    Also, there is a new book coming out titled "Renia's Dairy", kind of a Polish Diary of Anne Frank. Renia was an 18 year old Jewish girl in Poland murdered by the Nazis. The Smithsonian has some excerpts from the book here. It's absolutely heartbreaking