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The Fishing and Hunting Thread

Discussion in 'Permanent Threads' started by Nettdata, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. Vaquero

    Vaquero
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    One of the best resources I saw about butchering deer was Steven Rinella’s show Meateater, which had an episode (season six, episode six on Netflix currently) about breaking down the deer into major cuts and options for processing and cooking.

    My family has generally brought deer to a game processor, but the last two years I’ve been able to process my friends deer in my garage. Biggest thing that helped us was a good table, and even more importantly cutting boards and good knives. You will burn up the edge frequently, so good carbon steel Dexter knives allow you to more easily break down the bigger portions of the shanks into roasts and such and get touched up more quickly.

    I also don’t recommend getting ambitious about trying to take apart the leg meat by the joint as there is so much cartilage and tendon material it becomes a horrible mess. Rinella’s thoughts on keeping it bone in and whole as a braising item sound more appealing than grinding it for burger and having sinew strands to pick out of the grinding plate.

    Those are a couple of my experiences with the last four deer we’ve broken down. Wood stove also helps keep the right ambiance. Keep a good cast iron pan on the stove and throw a couple fresh cut steaks down and you’ll wonder why you let someone else do the work.
     
  2. Kubla Kahn

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    I got Outdoor Edge's dvd on wild game butchering a few years back. Toughest part is angling around the pelvis. I disagree about working with the leg cuts. Do you just mean the lower shanks that are used in making osso buco? Though they are more sinew filled, unless you have a dedicated meat saw blade or bandsaw to make shank cuts, tossing the meat through the grinder ain't that bad. I usually do keep the more sinewy ground meat separate for heavier spiced longer cooked dishes then the meat I use for burger and meat loafs. The rear upper leg steaks, all the rounds, are great for jerky or thin slicing. My first butcher used to cut those cartoon steaks out of the rear leg with the bone in the middle. I never liked it and his refusal to leave the tenderloins whole is why I started doing it myself.

    If I ever make a dedicated area for doing this I'd get the drain and rig up a cooler with this AC wiring device.

    Few things Ive learned over the years:

    • Learn golf ball skinning technique.
    • Cut your flanks first thing when you are doing your tenderloin. I notice people forget about them and they make damn fine fajita meat.
    • If you want to make any amount of sausage, over 5 lbs at a time, get a dedicated stuffer or a jerky gun with the stuffing tubes. Using the meat grinder to stuff through tubes is next to useless, takes more time, and backs up enough in the auger you'll ruin the meats consistency and mouth feel before it makes it into the casing.
    • Sous Vide cookers cooke the best backstrap steaks you'll ever eat.
    • Use the lungs, heart, and liver to make Boudin.
    • Two hands are better than one.
    Anyone got any tips for the neck roast/meat? It always looks like a ton of meat then after cursing and struggling to remove 50 percent of it I usually give up.
     
  3. Nettdata

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    I treat it like a turkey carcass and put it in a big soup pot full of water for a couple of days and make killer beef consume out if it, and use the meat from it for a shepherd's pie or something similar.
     
  4. Vaquero

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    That’d be what I meant in the lower portion of the shank. I didn’t realize osso buco was a thing when helping, and my buddy didn’t want any bone in cuts. You make a good point though that it isn’t the worst through a grinder, it just plugged up the one we were using pretty well so we gave up on trying to fully clean out the lower shanks for presentable cuts.

    I’m hoping this year to get in on some good bone in cuts, but with CWD being a huge thing now in my area, I’m real hesitant to try a bone in neck roast, despite how good it’s supposed to be.
     
  5. walt

    walt
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    I was gonna go out for deer season this year, if only a day or two. But with all the flooding the creel running through our property is still too high and can't be crossed. So I'm not gonna bother.
     
  6. Rush-O-Matic

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    Well, that was fun.
    one.jpg
    two.jpg
     
  7. Nettdata

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  8. Improper

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    Nice!

    Great set up, and lots of birds. Good work man.
     
  9. Kubla Kahn

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  10. Rush-O-Matic

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    I got invited on a hunt. It's a private plantation (no that kind) in Georgia, and these were mostly pen-raised birds. I had been to some in south Georgia, but not this one east of Atlanta. Quail, chuckers, pheasant. First pic was Thu afternoon, second was Fri morning. Those are the guide's dogs and trucks. I shot one of my Dad's guns that's about the same age as me - never shot it before. Remington 1100 20 ga bored imp cylinder. It only has a 26" barrel, but I was quite pleased with it. Good times.