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Proofing yeast

Discussion in 'Cooking' started by bewildered, Oct 20, 2017.

  1. bewildered

    bewildered
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    For those of you who have not tried baking bread very much in the past, proofing yeast is the first step. Proofing yeast is just about activating the yeast, which is inactive when you purchase it, and will be the factor in how your bread Rises when you cook it. I keep a jar of what they call bread machine yeast in the butter compartment of my fridge. A packet of yeast, which a lot of recipes call for, equates to two and a half teaspoons, or just a little less than 1 tablespoon of yeast. I prefer to keep a large jar because it is much cheaper, and in the cold temperature in your refrigerator at lasts a very very long time. It comes in a dark jar to protect it from light.

    You want to proof yeast with warm water and some sort of simple sugar. White sugar is the most common one used, but I also like to use molasses or honey depending on the type of bread I am making. For bagels, you want to use malt syrup, which I was able to find it a health food store. Your water needs to be warm to proof the yeast but not too hot which will kill the yeast, and typically hot water from the tap is warm enough. You want to be able to put your hand in it and not scald your hand or be uncomfortable. You can use a thermometer if you are not confident in judging the temperature, and right around 98 to 102 degrees is ideal. it is also good to place it in a dark warm location to proof, and to do this I will warm up something in the microwave like a cup of water, and then put my bowl with my yeast, water, and sugar to proof in there. It only takes about 5 to 8 minutes to fully proof, and you will know it's done when the top is very fluffy and foamy. It is perfectly fine to leave it in there for a little extra time.

    Recipes always call for adding the salt at the proofing stage, but I always hold the salt back and add it when I am in kneeding my dough.
     
  2. bewildered

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    Proofed with molasses for pizza dough. Can you smell the yeast?

    [​IMG]

    1T yeast, 1t gluten, 1T molasses, 1.25c warm water