Adult Content Warning

This community may contain adult content that is not suitable for minors. By closing this dialog box or continuing to navigate this site, you certify that you are 18 years of age and consent to view adult content.

Canadian Thanksgiving Cooking Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by hooker, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. hooker

    hooker
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,154
  2. lust4life

    lust4life
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,562
    Location:
    Deepinthehearta, TX
    Roasted Turkey with Orange and Sage

    Rub: (This is enough for a 12-14 lb. bird)
    Granulated orange peel (2 TBS)
    Kosher salt (1 TBS)
    Sage (dried) (2 TBS)
    Freshly ground black pepper (1 tsp)
    Olive or grapeseed oil (2 TBS)

    2 oranges
    Whole cloves
    1 bunch fresh sage

    Turkey (if you have a fresh poultry market within reasonable distance, you owe it to yourself to get a fresh killed turkey. Short of that, I prefer an Empire Kosher turkey if it's store-bought).

    Normally, I brine poultry, but with this recipe, it's not necessary.

    Wash and dry the bird thoroughly. Mix rub, pull skin up from the breast, and spread half of the rub between meat and skin. Press the skin back down, apply a thin coating of cooking oil on the rest of the bird, and apply the rest of the rub.

    Using a small knife, make about 24 slits in each orange around the whole surface. Fill 12 slits in each orange with whole cloves. Put both of them in the cavity. Tie the bunch of sage with butcher's string, lay it on top of the oranges (turn the bird upside down if the oranges are big and cavity space is tight) . Roast as you normally would.

    The juice from the oranges permeates the meat and prevents it from drying out, and combined with the cloves and the sage, imparts a wonder flavor into the turkey.

    I've done this in the oven, on a grill, and in a smoker, all with equally awesome results.
     
  3. kuhjäger

    kuhjäger
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    104
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,392
    Location:
    Stockholm
    Anyone have a good recipe for a Tim Horton's stuffed turkey?
     
  4. tweetybird

    tweetybird
    Expand Collapse
    Experienced Idiot

    Reputation:
    30
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    244
    Location:
    SF
    If anyone could help me with my Thanksgiving holy grail, I would be very appreciative.

    My whole life my mom has been making cornbread stuffing using Mrs. Cubbison's brand box stuffing as a base. She adds onions, apples, sage, and other stuff, and it's damn good.

    However. I am done with boxed shit. I want to make my own, completely from scratch, including the cornbread. I'm specifically looking for a meat-free recipe, as it seems that every single recipe for homemade cornbread stuffing on the internet seems to have sausage in it (no, not a vegetarian, it's just my mom always made it meat-free so that's how I like it). Further, I'd really like a recipe that's meat-free as-is, since I am not good at tweaking recipes and my husband who is can't bake to save his hide.

    I got halfway there last year using my mom's Southern friend's recipe (cornbread cooked in a cast iron skillet full of bacon fat om nom nom - not opposed to bacon fat for baking purposes, just chunks of meat in the stuffing) but it still called for some boxed mix. I know there has to be better out there.

    Basically, I want my childhood, free of preservatives. Help?
     
  5. hooker

    hooker
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,154
    I might need to try this, this year:

    Brown Ale and Apple Stuffing

    A sweet and savory stuffing with rich flavors of browned butter, brown ale and caramelized apples, best baked in its own casserole dish.

    3 tablespoons butter

    2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

    3 tablespoons minced onion

    1/2 cup diced celery

    1 cup peeled and diced apples

    1 teaspoon dried sage

    1 teaspoon salt

    1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper

    1 cup brown ale

    5 to 6 cups dry stuffing crumbs

    1/3 cup toasted and chopped walnuts, optional

    Melt butter in a large stock pot and simmer until lightly browned. Add garlic, onion, celery and apple and stir well to coat. Cover pot and cook over low heat 5 minutes.

    Uncover pot, stir in sage, salt, pepper and brown ale. Simmer 2 minutes or until ale is steaming hot. Add 5 cups stuffing mix. Stir well, and check consistency. If too moist, add remaining bread crumbs.

    Scrape stuffing mixture into well-greased casserole dish, and sprinkle with walnuts, if desired. Heat in 350F oven until top is lightly browned. Serve with turkey or ham.
     
  6. hooker

    hooker
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,154
    Steamwhistle just posted a recipe for beer bread, and it looks super easy. Might have to cook up a beer inspired Thanksgiving meal this year.
     
  7. Creelmania

    Creelmania
    Expand Collapse
    Experienced Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Deep Fried Turkey


    Way easier than oven roasted and way juicier. Plus it's an excuse to sit around a propane burner outside and drink beers.

    The one downside is that stuffing can only be done on it's own in the oven.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. BL1Y

    BL1Y
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,012
    Are there any notable differences between the meal for Canadian and American Thanksgivings?
     
  9. Angel_1756

    Angel_1756
    Expand Collapse
    The Big Four-Oh

    Reputation:
    380
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,909
    Location:
    The T-dot O-dot one-of-a-kind
    Canadians don't eat that sweet potato-marshmallow atrocity.
     
  10. ghettoastronaut

    ghettoastronaut
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    70
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Messages:
    4,917
    Or that green bean casserole with canned mushroom soup and fried onions on top.
     
  11. BL1Y

    BL1Y
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,012
    I've had sweet potato atrocity, and also sweet potato awesomeness. It's sweet potato casserole vs. sweet potato souffle.
     
  12. Angel_1756

    Angel_1756
    Expand Collapse
    The Big Four-Oh

    Reputation:
    380
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,909
    Location:
    The T-dot O-dot one-of-a-kind
    Soufflés taunt me. I've never made one successfully.

    That said... Recipe please?
     
  13. hooker

    hooker
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    2,154
    I'm making Turkey Tetrazzini for dinner since it seems to be the only "day after" recipe that calls for everything I currently have in the fridge/cupboard.

    Any other good leftover turkey recipes out there?
     
  14. fishy

    fishy
    Expand Collapse
    Experienced Idiot

    Reputation:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    103
    Found this in the newspaper around this time last year and made it for T'giving. Everybody loved it, and it travels well so it's good to bring to somebody else's house.

    Make sure you boil/steam fresh sweet potatoes/yams, none of that canned bullshit.

    Sweet Potato Souffle

    2 cups mashed cooked sweet potatoes
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    2 eggs, beaten
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
    1 cup milk
    3/4 cup (1ˆ sticks) butter, melted and divided
    3/4 cup crushed corn flakes
    1/2 cup chopped pecans
    1/2 cup brown sugar

    1. Heat the oven to 400F degrees.

    2. In a large bowl, whisk together the mashed sweet potatoes, granulated sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg and milk until thoroughly combined. Whisk in half (1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) of the melted butter.

    3. Pour the mixture into a shallow, 2-quart casserole and bake for 20 minutes.
    4. While the sweet potatoes are baking, assemble the topping. In a medium bowl, combine the corn flakes, pecans, brown sugar and remaining (1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) melted butter.

    5. After 20 minutes, sprinkle the topping over the sweet potatoes. Bake for an additional 10 minutes. Remove and cool slightly before serving.
     
  15. BL1Y

    BL1Y
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,012
    "Whisk" may be an understatement. You need to whip it fast enough to incorporate air and make it light and fluffy.
     
  16. Nettdata

    Nettdata
    Expand Collapse
    Mr. Toast

    Reputation:
    2,894
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    25,940
    Giving of Thanks is over.

    We have an existing cooking thread, let's use it.