Adult Content Warning

This community may contain adult content that is not suitable for minors. By closing this dialog box or continuing to navigate this site, you certify that you are 18 years of age and consent to view adult content.

The Idiot Board Readers Corner - General Discussion

Discussion in 'Books' started by ReverendGodless, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. walt

    walt
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    405
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,201
    I recently finished The Day The World Came To Town by Jim DeFede. It's about how the planes were routed to Gander, Newfoundland and the citizens there rallied to take care of the stranded passengers.

    It was absolutely amazing to read. If the people and community are really that nice still, it makes me wanna pack up and move there.
     
  2. billy_2005

    billy_2005
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    17
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    It's a bit of a switch if you read it back to back with First Law. I think the characters were so good in First Law that if you go right to Best Served Cold you end up wishing they were back in that book. But I wouldn't say it's weaker, just different. It is standalone, so you won't technically miss anything major by skipping, but if you stick with Abercrombie's stuff there are some more minor characters that pop back up in major ways in other books.
     
  3. Bundy Bear

    Bundy Bear
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    135
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,125
    Location:
    Blue Mountains, Australia
    I've been pushing Erikson and the Malazan series for ages in here haha, he's just released a new book based on Karsa Orlong called The God is Not Willing. For those that have read the Malazan series I highly recommend the Stories of the Malazan Empire series by Ian C. Esslemont, they're fantastic as well and fit in with Erikson amazingly.

    They're old ones now but the Dune series by Frank Herbert is a great read as well.
     
  4. walt

    walt
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    405
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,201
    I tried Dune once and couldn’t get into it, but my brother said it takes a bit then gets your interest. So I’ll try it again.
     
  5. downndirty

    downndirty
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    477
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
    Messages:
    4,348
    Just finished "Five Nights At Memorial" by Sheri Fink, detailing the events at Memorial Hospital in NOLA, during Hurricane Katrina.

    Holy fucking fuck.

    Well worth the read. It was on the FEMA administrator's "reading list", and it has a lot of relevance as an emergency/disaster case study in fucking up. It also details the legal battle that ensued after a doctor allegedly euthanized patients "too sick to evacuate", a big fucking no-no. It was updated in 2015 to reflect recent changes in policy, medicine, and studies done on the incidents.

    For my money, a big issue was the communications. People in the hospital from essentially Saturday to Thursday had a hell of a time figuring out what was going on outside. The radio station they were tuned into kept falsely saying "martial law" had been declared, and sensationalizing looting, acts of violence and talked about bands of marauders, making hospital staff scared shitless and ensuring they turned away people. They didn't have a plan, nor any practice with their plans, so they had no idea what to do or how to do it. They worried about ridiculous shit, like the pharmacy being looted, instead of planning for evacuation and conserving precious resources. Also, they had no clear span of control, so you had people giving and taking orders without clear authority or reason to do so. Lastly, they were without power for maybe 3 days...that's all it took. 3 days for them to turn into "Lord of the Flies." They kept using the toilets, even though water wasn't working, instead of instituting some latrine policies. They had cars with air conditioners and limited electrical capabilities that sat unused, hell they even had a cancer center that still had power, that some of the executives used and simply never thought to mention to folks needing care. The centralized, standardized Incident command structure (ICS) was heavily modified after this to make sure this shit didn't ever repeat.

    Some stuff, like the radio spouting horseshit still hasn't been resolved. The book ended with a case study on a pandemic plan on how to share ventilators and triage care that I'd be real curious about now.

    The cascade of fuck that was Katrina was before my time, but we had just as many confounding situations with Maria, Harvey, Florence, Laura, and the pandemic. It's a wild read, worth it if for no other reason than to inspire thought as to how we prepare for shit to go off the rails.
     
  6. Frebis

    Frebis
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    339
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,502
    I need help here. I read for a half hour to my 5 year old son every night. We are currently reading Matilda. We have read every other Dahl novel now and need to move on to something else. The problem being I didn’t like reading when I was little so I don’t know where to go. Anyone have suggestions? Is he too young for the first Harry Potter book?
     
  7. Nettdata

    Nettdata
    Expand Collapse
    Mr. Toast

    Reputation:
    2,851
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    25,599
    Wow... that's a tough one. The only thing that comes to mind would be the Hardy Boys or Tom Swift type stuff... but that is so outdated it's not even funny. And I have no kids so really shouldn't be replying.

    I would have to think that Harry Potter is too mature for a 5 year old.... but I've been wrong many times before.
     
  8. sisterkathlouise

    sisterkathlouise
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    160
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    828
    I think Harry Potter will play better starting around 7 or 8. Iirc the books got more mature from one to the next, so while you might get away with reading the first one, as the characters get older it might be a bit much for a kid that young.

    My nieces have recently enjoyed the Detective Gordon books, but I’ve only read snippets. My sister loved the Junie B Jones books as a kid and I didn’t hate reading them to her when I was 10 or 11 and she was 5 or 6. I loved the Ramona Quimby books when I was around that age, and I also have a distinct memory of my aunt reading me a book called The Mixed Up Files if Mrs Basil E Frankwiler (or something like that) and being a big fan of that as well.

    If I were you, I might do a little searching on GoodReads because I bet some people have made well curated lists.
     
  9. Misanthropic

    Misanthropic
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    408
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    3,215
    Try Diary of a Wimpy Kid. Popular with that age group and entertaining.
     
  10. Frebis

    Frebis
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    339
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,502
    Thank you. I like this and there are corresponding movies. So he will be excited to see the book come to life.
     
  11. Bundy Bear

    Bundy Bear
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    135
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,125
    Location:
    Blue Mountains, Australia
    Just finished Steven Erikson's new Malazan book, The God is Not Willing: The First Tale of Witness. For those of you who have read his work, it's another outstanding read from him and the Malazan Marines are getting more outlandish as the Empire gets older. Well worth a read.
     
  12. billy_2005

    billy_2005
    Expand Collapse
    Average Idiot

    Reputation:
    17
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    It's sitting on the "read next" pile! So excite!
     
  13. Improper

    Improper
    Expand Collapse
    Disturbed

    Reputation:
    129
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    464
    The first handful of Lemony Snicket books aren't bad.
     
  14. Aetius

    Aetius
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    773
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    8,413
    Depends entirely on the kid. I was reading Crichton by age 9, whereas I graduated High School with kids who still couldn't read more than a stop sign. If your kid enjoys Dahl, then I'd try the following, in rough order, until you hit something too advanced for him:
    • Mr Popper's Penguins
    • My Friend the Vampire
    • My Father's Dragon
    • Hank the Cowdog
    • Sideways Stories from Wayside School
    • The Chronicles of Prydain
    • Mr. Tucket
    • Where the Red Fern Grows
    • The Chronicles of Narnia
    • The Enchanted Forest Chronicles
    • Interstellar Pig/Singularity/The Beasties
    • A Wrinkle In Time
    • Harry Potter
    • Redwall
    • The Hobbit
    • Ender's Game
    • His Dark Materials
     
  15. Bundy Bear

    Bundy Bear
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    135
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,125
    Location:
    Blue Mountains, Australia
    There is an Australian author called Paul Jennings who wrote some good children's books called Around the Twist.
     
  16. Misanthropic

    Misanthropic
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    408
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    3,215
    Never mind all that - when is your buddy coming out with his next book. The first one was great.
     
  17. walt

    walt
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    405
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,201
    I've been taking a little break from writing in order to enjoy some reading for a change. This week I read Tender Is The Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica. It's a dystopian novel, originally released in Spain, about a future society where humans are raised by other humans for food.

    This book has to be the most fucked up thing I have ever read. It was so brutal, and so graphic that I wasn't sure I could finish it. However the author writes in a way that compels you to turn the page, kind of like when you can't turn away from a bad car accident. You just have to see what's next. And when it was done, I was like, "Oh thank God."

    Despite all this, I gave it a 5-star rating on Goodreads for the following reasons:

    1. The author's intent was obviously to shock the reader, and she certainly did.
    2. It was well written overall, although I've read that the translated version takes away some of the "beauty" of her style. But I don't speak a whole lot of Spanish so I'll take their word for it.
    3. I know now that no matter how depraved my writing brain can try be, I will never write something so horrific as this story.
     
  18. walt

    walt
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    405
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,201
    I'd like to recommend a book I just picked up after using it advertised on social media. Rewind by Christopher Barnard is sort of a mix between Dances With Wolves meets The Time Machine, only set in the Ice Age:

    "When Charlie, an outlaw from modern life, wakes up to find himself in the last ice age, his pockets are empty save for a pack of cigarettes and a lighter.

    Adopted by a tribe who find him on the freezing tundra, he is for the first time in his life part of a family. He falls in love with the chief’s daughter, but she is already the object of a murderous obsession by a man who doesn't take kindly to Charlie's interest. A violent revenge is plotted. If Charlie is to save the tribe, he must put aside his own selfish interests. And with Charlie, that's easier said than done..."

    I normally wouldn't read this style of writing ( first person, present tense ) but I was hooked on the story so quick after a while it didn't matter. Best of all, it's currently available for free. You can get a copy here.
     
  19. Rush-O-Matic

    Rush-O-Matic
    Expand Collapse
    Emotionally Jaded

    Reputation:
    1,299
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    12,008
    Has anybody read The Exchange yet? John Grisham's sequel to The Firm.